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Vol 3 Issue 8

Volume  3  Issue  8

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HAMID MEHMOOD,SYED IFTIKHAR-UL-HASSAN,ZAHID ZAHOOR,SAAD MASOOD,WAQAR AHMED,RAFEEHA TALIB

Consumers’ Resistance to Eco-Innovation: Investigating the Behavior of Pakistani Consumers towards Adoption of Solar PV-Systems

[Abstract] [Full-Text PDF] [html]

Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the behavior of Pakistani consumers’ toward adoption of solar system and their effect on consumers’ resistance. The domestic solar systems are a comprehensive electrification option for households in developing countries like Pakistan. The current energy crisis in Pakistan enforces the government and public to look into available alternative energy resources to meet the demand for electricity. The domestic solar systems are at an early stage and facing hurdles in disseminating into market; people do not know whether to adopt these technologies or not because of different uncertainty factors. An already tested innovation adoption framework, [1] diffusion of innovations theory, investigating consumers’ behavior towards domestic solar systems is used in this study along with its classification of different innovation characteristics [2]. This foundation theory and its innovation characteristics were seen as constructive and useful in order to accomplish the objectives of the study.

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Khamfore B. Kelebogile,Tsayang Gabatshwane

Educational design based research (DRB): a key to successful leadership in Botswana schools

[Abstract] [Full-Text PDF] [html]

Abstract: This paper advocates for educational design research approach for school leaders or managers in Botswana. This approach allows school leaders or managers to address complex problems in educational practice for which no clear guidelines for solutions are available. Researchers perceive Educational design research as a systematic study of designing, developing and evaluating educational interventions like programs, teaching-learning strategies and materials. This paper looks at research in the context of school heads in Botswana as they are at the helm of schools which of late have been characterized by declining academic results and morals. This is a concept paper based on desktop review intended to argue for the value of educational design research approach in addressing school head challenges.

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Adedire Oluwafemi, Osesusi Adebayo, Atere Ayoade and Ibrahim Kudirat

Studies on the Culinary and Antimicrobial Properties of Cinnamon (Cinnamon aromaticum) and Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis)

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Abstract: Cinnamon and Bay leaf have recently been the subject of intense investigations because of their culinary properties and ability to increasing the safety and shelf life of food. In this study, the sensory properties (using the nine-point Hedonic Scale) and possible antimicrobial effects of Cinnamon and Bay spices added as crude hygienic water extracts (3% m/m food preparation) were determined in cake and rice respectively. The general acceptability score of rice with bay leaf was not statistically different from that of rice sample cooked without bay leaf, while cake with cinnamon had better sensory scores (with general acceptability score of 7.5) than samples baked without cinnamon (with general acceptability score of 5.8). Bacterial genera isolated in these food samples include: Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Streptococcus, Escherichia and Pseudomonas. It appeared bay leaf extract inhibited the growth of Streptococcus and Pseudomonas species and also reduced the diversity of spoilage bacteria in rice from 8 to 5 while cinnamon extract reduced the diversity of spoilage bacteria in cake from 7 to 5 and also inhibited the manifestation of Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas species in cake sample.

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Iren, Otobong B. , Udo, Idorenyin A. , Asawalam, Damian O. and Osodeke, Victor E.

Comparative effects of different nitrogen sources from organic manure and urea fertilizer on growth, crude protein and nutrient uptake of Amaranthus cruentus

[Abstract] [Full-Text PDF] [html]

Abstract: Abstract: A two-year field trial was conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria to evaluate the effects of different organic fertilizer sources and an inorganic fertilizer on growth, crude protein and nutrient uptake of Amaranthus cruentus. Sixteen (16) treatments were laid out in a randomized complete block design with 3 replications. Four sources of organic fertilizer (cattle, goat, pig and poultry manures) and an inorganic fertilizer source (urea) were evaluated each at three nitrogen (N) rates (30, 60 and 90 kg N/ha). Plots with no fertilizer application served as the control. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and means compared with Turky’s HSD at 5 % level of probability. The results showed that the amendments applied, significantly (P ≤ 0.05) enhanced growth of Amaranthus. Higher rates of pig and poultry manures were as effective as higher rates of urea. Crude protein content of leaf was increased significantly, the highest being in urea at 90 kg N/ha (19.57 %) followed by urea at 60 kg N/ha (17. 98 %) and pig manure at 90 kg N/ha (17.73 %). The amendments applied significantly (P ≤ 0.05) enhanced the uptake of some major elements compared with the control. The greatest nutrient uptake was obtained in plots amended with pig manure at 90 kg N/ha. The trial has illustrated that pig manure when applied at 90 kg N/ha could substitute urea fertilizer in Amaranthus production

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